The Silo Effect - Treehouse CD



The five tracks of “Treehouse” fuse elements of “livetronica,” “jam” and rock to make an expansive, addictive debut.


The Silo Effect first formed as a "collective of musicians" in Richmond, Virginia in 2007.  By blending elements of "livetronica," funk, and electric disco, the band offers a lush, layered palate with the 45 minutes of "Treehouse."  The five tracks shift and mutate, becoming musical tapestries that are symphonic in composition and execution.  The Silo Effect features the talents of Steve Owen (bass, vocals, and midi), Matt Hughes (guitar), Bryan "Rico" Reyes (drums), and Matthew Henry (keyboard).  Bobby Hudson contributes percussion on the first two tracks, while Taylor Smith provides the engineering for the album.  The album was recorded in analog at Sound of Music Studios in Richmond, Virginia, and this analog recording style contributes to a warm, organic, "living room" sound. 

The title track begins with elegant, clean guitar lines and a tasteful mix of percussion and drums.  The song ventures through various moods and motions, utilizing meditative, metaphysical lyrics to complement the foundations of the song.  This track demonstrates the elegance of early Lotus, with a soaring jam sensibility.  "Kasyapa" is another energetic romp that morphs through various dimensions and textures of sound.  The end result is a satisfying, pleasing jam with lots nooks and crannies to explore.  The album takes a contemplative turn with the beginning of "Surfaces," but this track also diverges and meanders with some truly wicked keyboard runs and yearning guitar.  "Yam Fighter" gallops along with stratospheric guitar, then yields to Henry's fluid fingers on the keys.   "Flight of the Dog" begins methodically, as layered guitar is added to a concoction of bass and drums.  The song swells in intensity with feverish beats, driving rhythm, and a loping, urgent guitar.

The five tracks displayed on "Treehouse" provide lots to chew on, offering more to write about than other albums with twice as many tracks.  The album is personified by clean, elegant guitar lines, excellent midi and loop effects, and excellent compositions.  As mentioned, these expansive songs transition from subtle origins to confident, muscular jams.  The results are quite addictive. 

- J. Evan Wade